ROOSEVELT, THEODORE Typed Letter Signed

”This nation owes it to itself to refuse to be neutral between right and wrong... We are false to the memory of the great Americans of the past, if we sit by with our hands folded, and fail to make an effective protest when such hideous enormities are practiced as those practiced by Germany in Belgium..."No such infamy has been perpetrated in any war between civilized powers for over two centuries. It is for us, as the largest neutral nation, to remember that when neutrals fail to protest against action of this kind, they become accomplices in wrong-doing....”REMARKABLE AND IMPASSIONED LETTER BY ROOSEVELT ON THE MORAL RESPONSIBILITY OF AMERICANS TO ENTER THE FIRST WORLD WAR. The letter, typed on Roosevelt’s Metropolitan Office stationery and dated January 8, 1917, is addressed to Judge Daniel J. Kenefick, the Chairman of the Committee of Protest on Enslavement of Belgians and Poles and reads in full:My dear Judge Kenefick:I wish I could be present at the Buffalo meeting to speak on behalf of the Belgians and Poles, and against their enslavement. As that is impossible, may I, through you, express my deep sympathy with your meeting and its purpose. This nation owes it to itself to refuse to be neutral between right and wrong. Our prime duty, of course, is the duty of self-defense, the duty of protecting the honor and the interest of this country, and of guaranteeing our own people against wrong. But second only to this duty, comes the duty of making our views heard, and, if possible, our weight felt, on the side of righteousness and against iniquity in international affairs. We are false to the memory of the great Americans of the past, if we sit by with our hands folded, and fail to make an effective protest when such hideous enormities are practiced as those practiced by Germany in Belgium. I believe that similar deeds have been done in Poland, but as regards the Belgians, and as regards the men and women deported from northern France, we have not had merely ample, but minute information. These men and women in northern France have been sent into state slavery in Germany, and over 100,000 Belgians have suffered the same fate. They are sent to Germany so that by their labor they are aiding Germans in killing their fellow country-men. No such infamy has been perpetrated in any war between civilized powers for over two centuries. It is for us, as the largest neutral nation, to remember that when neutrals fail to protest against action of this kind, they become accomplices in wrong-doing. A private individual, who sees some powerful law breaker knock down a helpless woman or child, and who himself makes no protest and no effort at rescue of any kind, is rightly regarded as being tainted in some manner with the crime. Exactly the same kind of condemnation should be meted out to this nation for not having interfered to the extent of its power, in the effort to prevent the hideous iniquity that has just been perpetrated. I am very glad that this meeting of protest has been called. Sincerely yours, [signed] Theodore RooseveltJanuary, 1917, was a critical time in the evolution of US opinion over the war in Europe. As late as January 22, 1917, President Wilson argued, in his “peace without victory” address, that the US should not engage in military action. However, “Germany's decision to begin unrestricted submarine warfare in February 1917 ended Wilson's pursuit of impartial U.S. neutrality... and in mid-March 1917, when German submarines sank three U.S. ships, Wilson was forced to make a choice. No longer able to remain at peace and protect the nation's maritime and commercial interests, Wilson led the United States into the European conflict shortly after the inauguration of his second term. At a special session of the new Congress on 2 April 1917, denouncing Germany's autocratic government and its submarine warfare, he called for war to liberate all nations from this threat, including the Germans themselves. He proclaimed that 'the world must be made safe for democracy.' Four days later, Congress declared war against Germany" (American National Biography).Roosevelt, in this letter, powerfully argues for US involvement on moral grounds, and reveals much about his philosophy with regard to one nation’s responsibility to the suffering people of another nation.Quarto, two pages (typed on rectos only) on Roosevelt’s Metropolitan letterhead. Signed in full in ink and with numerous manuscript corrections in Roosevelt’s hand. Expected folds, otherwise fine. ROOSEVELT LETTERS WITH SUCH EXTRAORDINARY CONTENT ARE VERY RARE. 
$12,500

ROOSEVELT, THEODORE [Photograph Signed]

“There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.” - Theodore RooseveltHUGE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT AS PRESIDENT, INSCRIBED TO ROOSEVELT’S PHYSICIAN AND CLOSE FRIEND. The large image depicts the bespectacled president seated at his desk holding some papers. Roosevelt’s personal inscription, in deep black fountain pen upon the reverse blank portion of the papers in his hand in this image reads, in full: “To Alexander Lambert with the affectionate regard of his friend -- Theodore Roosevelt -- March 4th 1907”.In his second term as president, Theodore Roosevelt inscribed this image to his close friend and family physician Alexander Lambert. Not only was the relationship between the two well-documented in numerous letters and telegrams, but also the doctor accompanied Roosevelt on several of the president’s famous hunts.While 1907 marked the end of his two-term presidency, Roosevelt accomplished much as the nation’s 26th president. “The administration of Theodore Roosevelt was in some respects the first modern presidency. It is with Roosevelt that the most distinctive twentieth-century characteristics of the executive office emerged as more or less permanent traits. Roosevelt put the presidency and the federal government at the center of peacetime political action” (Encyclopedia.com). Beautifully framed under UV-protected museum glass. Size: Approx. 11x14 inches (photograph alone); 18.5x21.5 inches (framed). Original sepia-toned silver print. Two small chips at the top corners (not visible under the frame); otherwise in nearly perfect condition. Inscription crisp and dark, with a particularly fine example of Roosevelt's signature (the signature by itself is 3.25 inches long). AN EXTREMELY RARE OVER-SIZED PHOTO, WITH OUTSTANDING ROOSEVELT INSCRIPTION AND SIGNATURE.
$9,500

GRANT, ULYSSES S. Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant

"What General Lee's feelings were I do not know. As he was a man of much dignity, with an impassible face, it was impossible to say whether he felt inwardly glad that the end had finally come, or felt sad over the result, and was too manly to show it. Whatever his feelings, they were entirely concealed from my observation; but my own feelings, which had been quite jubilant on the receipt of his letter, were sad and depressed. I felt like anything rather than rejoicing at the downfall of a foe who had fought so long and valiantly, and had suffered so much for a cause, though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse. I do not question, however, the sincerity of the great mass of those who were opposed to us." -Grant, upon meeting Lee at Appomattox Court House to discuss the terms of surrender.FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL PUBLISHER'S DELUXE MOROCCO of Grant's important and fascinating memoirs, illustrated throughout with numerous steel engravings, facsimiles, and over forty maps. Written during the final days of Grant's life and seen through publication by Mark Twain, the Memoirs provide a personal and poignant record of some of the most significant events in American history. Octavo, original three-quarters publisher's deluxe morocco with gilt medallions on boards, marbled endpapers and edges. Two volumes. Neat owner's signature on front free endpaper (verso) of both volumes; volume I with old newspaper clipping after last page of preface with corresponding offsetting on table of contents. Small chip at the base of volume II spine. A beautiful set, rare in such good condition.
$1,950

Grant, Ulysses S. Ulysses S. Grant: Vellum Document Signed

SIGNED BY ULYSSES S. GRANT AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.Partly-printed vellum document signed, “U.S. Grant,” as president. Military commission appointing H. Schuyler Ross a First Assistant Engineer in the Navy. Countersigned by George M. Robeson as Secretary of the Navy. Washington, 1873. Approximately 19 1/2x16 inches; slightly faded signature, usual folds, minor soiling, seal intact. SOLD AT SWANN in 2008 (March 13, 2008, lot 155.)
$1,700

MORISON, SAMUEL ELIOT Admiral of the Ocean Sea a Life of Chistopher Columbus

FIRST EDITION. With numerous illustrations, including maps by Erwin Raisz and drawings by Bertram Greene. "Morison spent five months aboard a three-masted sailing ship, retracing the explorer’s routes 10,000 miles across the Atlantic and around the Caribbean. The resulting book, Admiral of the Ocean Sea: A Life of Christopher Columbus (1942), made Morison’s name as a scholar who was not content to dwell in the archives." –Smithsonian Magazine"This book arose out of a desire to know exactly where Columbus sailed on his Four Voyages, and what sort of seaman he was. No previous work on the Discoverer of America answers these questions in a manner to satisfy even an amateur seafarer. Most biographies of the Admiral might well be entitled "Columbus to the Water's Edge'..." –from the Preface Octavo, red buckram, original dust jackets, original publisher's slipcase. A fine set.