GIBBON, EDWARD The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

FIRST EDITIONS. "To this task Gibbon brought a width of vision and a critical mastery of the available sources which have not been equalled to this day; and the result was clothed in an inimitable prose" (PMM, 222). Six volumes. Quarto. Contemporary tan calf rebacked with old red and green lettering-pieces laid down, gilt in compartments. Engraved portrait frontispiece in Vol. I, 2 folding maps in Vol. II, 1 folding map in Vol. III, without half-titles in Vols. II and III, others present. Frontispiece slightly foxed as usual, some offsetting, a few gatherings slightly foxed, a very good set. With portrait frontispiece of Gibbon (in vol. I), 1 folding map of Europe adjacent to Constantinople (in vol. II) 1 folding map of the Eastern Roman Empire and 1 folding map of the Western Roman Empire (in vol. III). The portrait of Gibbon "engraved by Joseph Hall from an original picture painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds" published by Strahan and Cadell in 1780 and issued with the second volume, has been moved by the binder to the appropriate place, at the beginning of vol. I. That volume is in the second of two variant states, without the cancels X4 and a4.
$27,000

KOELHOFF, JOHANN (THE YOUNGER) [The Cologne Chronicle] Die Cronica van der hilliger Stat van Coellen

FIRST EDITION. The Cologne Chronicle is famous for a lengthy passage, on leaf 311 (verso), that provides the first printed account of the development of printing. "There are few ancient books which have been so frequently quoted, yet so rarely seen, as the present Chronicle. The possession of it is, indeed, essential to a Library like the one under description; since there is an important passage in it, relating to the invention of the Art of Printing with Metal Types, which merits very particular attention; and which has been referred to, or quoted, by bibliographers for nearly the two last centuries...  The rarity of this Chronicle is sufficiently attested by bibliographers, even without noticing that Hartz and Buder... who wrote expressly upon German affairs, had no knowledge whatever of it; and Naudaus doubted its existence. I am disposed to think there are not three copies of it in this country..."–Dibdin Folio. Contemporary tooled half-leather over oak boards. 354 (of 368) leaves. This copy lacking first 12 leaves, containing the first title and the register (index). Second title toned and laid down. Some toning and staining. Woodcut illustrations throughout. A sound copy. RARE.
$25,000

ROOSEVELT, THEODORE Typed Letter Signed

”This nation owes it to itself to refuse to be neutral between right and wrong... We are false to the memory of the great Americans of the past, if we sit by with our hands folded, and fail to make an effective protest when such hideous enormities are practiced as those practiced by Germany in Belgium..."No such infamy has been perpetrated in any war between civilized powers for over two centuries. It is for us, as the largest neutral nation, to remember that when neutrals fail to protest against action of this kind, they become accomplices in wrong-doing....”REMARKABLE AND IMPASSIONED LETTER BY ROOSEVELT ON THE MORAL RESPONSIBILITY OF AMERICANS TO ENTER THE FIRST WORLD WAR. The letter, typed on Roosevelt’s Metropolitan Office stationery and dated January 8, 1917, is addressed to Judge Daniel J. Kenefick, the Chairman of the Committee of Protest on Enslavement of Belgians and Poles and reads in full:My dear Judge Kenefick:I wish I could be present at the Buffalo meeting to speak on behalf of the Belgians and Poles, and against their enslavement. As that is impossible, may I, through you, express my deep sympathy with your meeting and its purpose. This nation owes it to itself to refuse to be neutral between right and wrong. Our prime duty, of course, is the duty of self-defense, the duty of protecting the honor and the interest of this country, and of guaranteeing our own people against wrong. But second only to this duty, comes the duty of making our views heard, and, if possible, our weight felt, on the side of righteousness and against iniquity in international affairs. We are false to the memory of the great Americans of the past, if we sit by with our hands folded, and fail to make an effective protest when such hideous enormities are practiced as those practiced by Germany in Belgium. I believe that similar deeds have been done in Poland, but as regards the Belgians, and as regards the men and women deported from northern France, we have not had merely ample, but minute information. These men and women in northern France have been sent into state slavery in Germany, and over 100,000 Belgians have suffered the same fate. They are sent to Germany so that by their labor they are aiding Germans in killing their fellow country-men. No such infamy has been perpetrated in any war between civilized powers for over two centuries. It is for us, as the largest neutral nation, to remember that when neutrals fail to protest against action of this kind, they become accomplices in wrong-doing. A private individual, who sees some powerful law breaker knock down a helpless woman or child, and who himself makes no protest and no effort at rescue of any kind, is rightly regarded as being tainted in some manner with the crime. Exactly the same kind of condemnation should be meted out to this nation for not having interfered to the extent of its power, in the effort to prevent the hideous iniquity that has just been perpetrated. I am very glad that this meeting of protest has been called. Sincerely yours, [signed] Theodore RooseveltJanuary, 1917, was a critical time in the evolution of US opinion over the war in Europe. As late as January 22, 1917, President Wilson argued, in his “peace without victory” address, that the US should not engage in military action. However, “Germany's decision to begin unrestricted submarine warfare in February 1917 ended Wilson's pursuit of impartial U.S. neutrality... and in mid-March 1917, when German submarines sank three U.S. ships, Wilson was forced to make a choice. No longer able to remain at peace and protect the nation's maritime and commercial interests, Wilson led the United States into the European conflict shortly after the inauguration of his second term. At a special session of the new Congress on 2 April 1917, denouncing Germany's autocratic government and its submarine warfare, he called for war to liberate all nations from this threat, including the Germans themselves. He proclaimed that 'the world must be made safe for democracy.' Four days later, Congress declared war against Germany" (American National Biography).Roosevelt, in this letter, powerfully argues for US involvement on moral grounds, and reveals much about his philosophy with regard to one nation’s responsibility to the suffering people of another nation.Quarto, two pages (typed on rectos only) on Roosevelt’s Metropolitan letterhead. Signed in full in ink and with numerous manuscript corrections in Roosevelt’s hand. Expected folds, otherwise fine. ROOSEVELT LETTERS WITH SUCH EXTRAORDINARY CONTENT ARE VERY RARE. 
$12,500

SIDONIUS, CAIUS SOLLIUS APOLLINARIS Poema aureum eiusdemque epistole

SECOND (FIRST DATED) EDITION OF SIDONIUS, AN EXCELLENT COPY FROM ULRICH SCINZENELER'S MILAN PRESS. Sidonius, a diplomat, poet and bishop, is one of the key sources from 5th-century Gaul. Sidonius married the daughter of the Roman Emperor Avitus. The Golden Poems in this volume were written in honor of the Avitus. He was rewarded with a bronze statue in Tranjan's library. Chancery folio (283 x 194mm.), 144 leaves, 57 lines commentary surrounding text, Roman and Greek letter, woodcut initials. 18th century full-leather binding, expertly rebacked preserving original spine (except for lower spine panel which is done to style), gilt ornaments to boards, spine gilt, marbled endpapers. Bookplates at front pastedown. (Gerald P. Mander, Walter Goldwater). A clean copy with wide margins; light dampstains at lower margin of first 30 leaves, occasional dampstains throughout; repair at lower portion of title page (not affecting text).  This is the first edition with a commentary by Joannes Baptista Pius and the second printed edition, preceded by the exceedingly scarce 1474 edition. Hain Copinger 1287; Goff S 494.
$12,000

ROOSEVELT, THEODORE [Photograph Signed]

“There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.” - Theodore RooseveltHUGE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT AS PRESIDENT, INSCRIBED TO ROOSEVELT’S PHYSICIAN AND CLOSE FRIEND. The large image depicts the bespectacled president seated at his desk holding some papers. Roosevelt’s personal inscription, in deep black fountain pen upon the reverse blank portion of the papers in his hand in this image reads, in full: “To Alexander Lambert with the affectionate regard of his friend -- Theodore Roosevelt -- March 4th 1907”.In his second term as president, Theodore Roosevelt inscribed this image to his close friend and family physician Alexander Lambert. Not only was the relationship between the two well-documented in numerous letters and telegrams, but also the doctor accompanied Roosevelt on several of the president’s famous hunts.While 1907 marked the end of his two-term presidency, Roosevelt accomplished much as the nation’s 26th president. “The administration of Theodore Roosevelt was in some respects the first modern presidency. It is with Roosevelt that the most distinctive twentieth-century characteristics of the executive office emerged as more or less permanent traits. Roosevelt put the presidency and the federal government at the center of peacetime political action” (Encyclopedia.com). Beautifully framed under UV-protected museum glass. Size: Approx. 11x14 inches (photograph alone); 18.5x21.5 inches (framed). Original sepia-toned silver print. Two small chips at the top corners (not visible under the frame); otherwise in nearly perfect condition. Inscription crisp and dark, with a particularly fine example of Roosevelt's signature (the signature by itself is 3.25 inches long). AN EXTREMELY RARE OVER-SIZED PHOTO, WITH OUTSTANDING ROOSEVELT INSCRIPTION AND SIGNATURE.
$9,500

FRANK, ANNE FRAGMENTEN UIT HET DAGBOEK VAN ANNE FRANK [Het Achterhuis; The Secret Annex; Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl]

“[Anne Frank] became the most memorable figure to emerge from World War II--besides Hitler, of course, who also proclaimed his life and his beliefs in a book. In a way, the Holocaust began with one book and ended with another. Yet it was Anne's that finally prevailed--a beneficent and complicated work outlasting a simple and evil one.” -Roger RosenblattTHE EXCEEDINGLY RARE FIRST APPEARANCE OF ANY PART OF THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK; PRECEDING THE BOOK EDITION. A BEAUTIFUL COPY IN SCARCE ORIGINAL WRAPPERS. "The diary written by Anne Frank is probably the single most widely read book to come out of the Holocaust... Millions of readers have read the story of the teenage girl's two years in hiding. It has been translated into more than thirty-five languages and published in as many countries. Her diary was also the foundation for a successful drama performed worldwide (The Diary of Anne Frank, 1956) and a film of the same title (1959). Especially in the last twenty years, many schoolchildren and adults alike have had their first exposure to the effects of Adolf Hitler's war through Anne's writing. Anne's diary so captured the attention of the world that her name has become symbolic of the six million Jewish victims of the Shoah…
"To many, Anne Frank has become a symbol of the strength and optimism of the human spirit in the midst of tragedy. In July 1944 Anne wrote what was to become the most famous line of her diary and the one most often used to symbolize her spirit. 'In spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart'… Anne's writing put a human face to the unfathomable statistics of the millions of individuals who suffered and died" (Sarita Cargas, Encyclopedia of Holocaust Literature).On the publication in De Nieuwe Stem:The Diary, although now recognized as such an important historical document, almost never found its way into print. Anne’s father, Otto Frank, gained possession of the manuscript after the war. By April 1946, the diary already had been rejected by several publishers and Otto Frank was having doubts about continuing to pursue publication. It was at this time that “he gave one typed copy to a friend, who lent it to Jan Romein, a professor of modern history. Much to Otto Frank’s surprise the professor devoted an article to it in a Dutch newspaper, Het Parool... Romein’s article appeared on April 3, 1946, hailing the diary as an outstanding example of wartime documentation by a remarkably talented Jewish girl (whose name was not disclosed)... His friends now urged Otto Frank to have Anne’s diary published as she herself had wished” (quoted in Jeffrey Shandler, From Diary to Book).Jan Romein was so impressed by the diary that, as one of the editors of the new left-leaning journal De Nieuwe Stem, he was able to arrange for the publication of excerpts from the diary in the journal’s sixth issue, appearing in June 1946. These five excerpts (to "Kitty") begin on July 11, 1942, and conclude on April 11, 1944 and “mark the first publication of Anne’s writing” (ibid), preceding the book edition, ultimately published in 1947 with a preface by Jan Romein’s wife, Anne Romein-Verschoor.Octavo, original wrappers; custom box. Text in Dutch. Light chipping to wrapper edges; overall a remarkably well-preserved copy.
$9,500

BARTOLI, PIETRO SANTI & BELLORI, GIOVANNI PIETRO Colonna Traiana, erreta del Senato, e Popolo Romano all'Imperatore

FIRST EDITION. COMPLETE WITH 128 engraved plates (including title and dedication). "The Column of Trajan was dedicated on May 18, AD 113, and commemorates a series of militray campaigns waged by the emperor in Dacia between AD 101 and 106... The column itself if composed of 17 separate drums of fine Luna marble, and the carved spiral frieze contains 155 different scenes featuring 2,600 carved figures... the fine details of the carvings... have proven to be of enormous use to historians and archaeologists in reconstructing the particulars of Roman military equipment and tactics, as well as the interactions of the Romans with barbarians."–Gregory S. Aldrete, Daily Life in the Roman CIty: Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia Oblong folio. 128 engraved plates (incl. title & dedication); without the 9 leaves of text (as often). Uncut in 19th century half roan (some light wear to edges, short splits in lower joints, foxing to title & a few other plates, mainly in the margins).
$9,000

BARTOLI, PIETRO SANTI & BELLORI (GIOVANNI PIETRO) Veteres arcus Augustorum triumphis insignes

FIRST EDITION. A splendid work beautifully illustrated with 48 superb engravings (on 46 sheets) depicting bas-reliefs of triumphal arches in Rome. Folio. 18th-century calf, spine elaborately gilt with gilt-stamped spine label, marbled endpapers.  Engraved portrait of dedicatee (Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni), 48 engraved plates. Binding lightly rubbed with moderate wear at spine head; clean throughout. A lovely wide margined copy.
$8,000

BARTOLI, PIETRO SANTI & BELLORI (GIOVANNI PIETRO) Veteres arcus Augustorum triumphis insignes

FIRST EDITION. A splendid work beautifully illustrated with 48 superb engravings (on 46 sheets) depicting bas-reliefs of triumphal arches in Rome. Folio. 18th-century calf, spine elaborately gilt with gilt-stamped spine label, marbled endpapers.  Engraved portrait of dedicatee (Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni), 48 engraved plates. Binding lightly rubbed with moderate wear at spine head; clean throughout. A lovely wide margined copy.
$8,000

WARE, ISAAC Complete Body of Architecture Adorned with Plans and Elevations, from Original Designs

FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE, with plate numbers within the plate lines and the plate at 70-71 uncorrected and reading“Warwick Shire”.“We hope to lay down in one body the whole science of architecture, from its first rudiments to its utmost perfection; and that in a manner which shall render every part of it intelligible to every reader; to acquaint the gentleman with what, on every possible occasion, he should design in his edifice; and to instruct the practical builder in not only what he ought to do, but how he should execute it, to his own credit, and to the advantage of the owner.” –Isaac Ware, Complete Body of Architecture“The modern concept of architecture as a profession was formed after about 1750 ... [the] two major books of English professional architectur- al instruction of the eighteenth century [were] Ware’ Complete Body of Architecture and Sir William Chambers’s Treatise on Civil Architecture” (Studies in Eighteenth-Century British Art and Aesthetics).Folio, full contemporary calf, elaborately gilt spine in seven pan- els. Engraved frontispiece, title in red and black with engraved vignette, engraved head-piece and 114 plates (many of them fold- ing). Boards lightly rubbed, skillful repairs at hinges and spine ends, clean throughout. An excellent copy.
$8,000

APIANUS, PETRUS & BARTHOLOMEUS AMANTIUS Inscriptiones sacrosanctae vetustatis: non illae quidem Romanae, sed totius fere orbis summo studio... conquistae

FIRST EDITION of the first comprehensive collection of Latin inscriptions from the press of Apianus. Inscriptiones Sacrosanctae was commissioned by the German banker Raimund Fugger whose own collection of antiquities, together with the collection of Peutinger, provide the basis of the majority of Apianus's study. This work gathered inscrptions from all over Europe and, for the first time, arranged them geographically. Folio. Contemporary full vellum. Title printed in red & black, with large woodcut after Durer. Woodcut arms of Raimund Fugger (dedicatee), approx. 180 woodcuts in the text, most pages with ornamental woodcut borders, printer's device at back. Elegant early owner inscription on title. A lovely copy with only very minor occasional spotting. Rare.
$7,500

GIBBON, EDWARD History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

FIRST EDITION of Vols II-VI, THIRD EDITION of vol I. This is the first issue of Volume I to set Gibbon's footnotes at page-bottom instead of an the end of the volume, a major iomprovement in readability. "To [his] task Gibbon brought a width of vision and a critical mastery of the available sources which have not been equalled to this day; and the result was clothed in an inimitable prose" (PMM). Six volumes. Quarto. Rebound in period style quarter calf over marbled boards, the spines gilt with red morocco title and volume labels. An attractive and desirable set. Clean throughout.
$7,500

AESCHYLUS Aeschyli tragoediae VII

FIRST COMPLETE EDITION OF AESCHYLUS. With the editio princeps of the Agamemnon. “An excellent and beautiful edition... It is a much more valuable impression than either of its precursors.. what enhances the value of the edition is, that the Agamemnon is published in it, for the first time, complete.” -Dibdin, An introduction to the knowledge of rare and valuable editions of the Greek and Latin Classics Quarto. Early full tree-calf skillfully rebacked, spine in six compartments, red leather label. Gilt dentelles, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Text generallly clean throughout; repaired tear to the lower portion of title page. A handsome copy of an important and distinguished edition.
$7,500